Home Royal News Harry shares personal photos & videos of time in Africa

Harry shares personal photos & videos of time in Africa

by Victoria Howard

After visiting Kruger Park and seeing the carcasses of recently poached white rhinos, Prince Harry has released some personal footage and photos of his summer in Africa, working on conservation projects, showing the plight of endangered species in Africa.

The first of seven releases was an image of the red-haired Prince assisting vets and experts in de-horning a rhino.

Prince Harry has released this personal photo taken during his summer visit to southern Africa. Here Prince Harry shares his story behind the photograph… “I was working with Dr. Mark Jago and Dr. Pete Morkel in Namibia. Some countries are de-horning small populations of rhino to deter poachers from shooting them. It is a short-term solution and surely no substitute for professional and well-trained rangers protecting these highly sought-after animals. De-horning has to be done every two years for it to be effective and can only realistically be done with small populations in open bush. My initial task each time was to monitor the heart rate and oxygen levels and help stabilise them as quickly as possible. My responsibilities then grew to taking blood and tissue samples and the de-horning itself.” You can learn more and how to help by visiting: https://www.savetherhino.org/africa_programmes/save_the_rhino_trust_namibia Photograph © Prince Harry

A photo posted by Kensington Palace (@kensingtonroyal) on

“I was working with Dr. Mark Jago and Dr. Pete Morkel in Namibia. Some countries are de-horning small populations of rhino to deter poachers from shooting them.

“My initial task each time was to monitor the heart rate and oxygen levels and help stabilise them as quickly as possible. My responsibilities then grew to taking blood and tissue samples and the de-horning itself.”

One of two videos depicts Harry feeding orphaned rhinos. Little information was released about Harry’s stint in the south of Africa, but he spent time at a rhino orphanage, and assisted in the calves’ care.

 

Prince Harry has released this personal video taken during his summer visit to southern Africa. Here Prince Harry shares his story behind the video… “These baby rhinos are at an orphanage because their mothers were killed by poachers. I can’t say where this is for obvious reasons. But I spent an afternoon with Petronel Nieuwoubt who runs the orphanage. The youngest rhino was called Don. He was just two months old when he was found in Kruger National Park. Petronel has students and volunteers from all over the world come to look after these orphans. They pay for this experience and that money is used for milk, food, fencing and rangers for security.” For more information go to: www.careforwild.co.za Video ©Prince Harry

 

A video posted by Kensington Palace (@kensingtonroyal) on

“These baby rhinos are at an orphanage because their mothers were killed by poachers,” the tagline reads. “I can’t say where this is for obvious reasons. But I spent an afternoon with Petronel Nieuwoubt who runs the orphanage.

“The youngest rhino was called Don. He was just two months old when he was found in Kruger National Park. Petronel has students and volunteers from all over the world come to look after these orphans. They pay for this experience and that money is used for milk, food, fencing and rangers for security.”

Another video then came, of Harry assisting in the release of a rehabilitated rhino. The beast is blindfolded and struggles to its feet following sedation. The former army captain helps a ranger check on the animal as it comes around.

The tagline says “Trying to stop a three tonne rhino with a rope and a blindfold isn’t easy! Especially in this harsh terrain in Botswana.” Kensington Palace released the media on instagram, also providing information on the organisations that Harry helped, or supports.  

“Mapp Ives and Kai Collins, with the help of Botswana Defence Force and the government, are doing everything they can to protect their newly reintroduced rhino population. This sometimes means having to sedate them to check on how they’re doing,” the video’s tag explains.

Another photo shows Harry hugging a huge African Elephant, which had been sedated. The tag shows the Prince’s passion: “How can it be that 30,000 elephants were slaughtered last year alone? None of them had names, so do we not care?And for what? Their tusks?”

He called it a ‘poinltess waste of beauty’.

Harry also put out a photo of a mother, Thandi, and her calf, Thembi. The photo shows the two lying down in the grss, and is poingant, as the mother does not have her horn – it was hacked off by poachers, yet she survived and has gone on to have a calf.

“There is no pretending that any of this will be easy. It won’t be. But when we win this battle and reverse the rise in poaching, the victory will belong first and foremost to those on the frontiers,” the Prince said earlier today.

One of the most shocking photos is Harry assisting in an operation on a black rhino, the victim of poaching. Hope, as she was named, was tranquilised by the poachers, before they cut her horn off, damaging her face badly. The second operation, in which the Prince helped, was a success, though Harry’s comment on the photo shows his pain for the animals, as well as his passion to save them.

 

Prince Harry has released this personal photo taken during his summer visit to southern Africa. Here Prince Harry shares his story behind the photograph… “By this point many people will have heard of ‘Hope’, a young female black rhino that was brutally wounded by poachers in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. This was the second operation to try to save this animal’s life. Some poachers use a dart gun and tranquilize the animal so as to not have to fire a shot that would be heard. They then hack their face off while the animal is paralysed before running off with the horn. Local communities saw her stumbling through the bush and then alerted the authorities. Thanks to Dr William Fowlds and his team, Hope survived and is making a speedy recovery. I stared into her eyes while operating on her and thought at first that it would have been better and fairer to put her down rather than put her through the pain. Afterwards I was told of another female called Thandi who was in a similar state in 2012. She now has a baby calf called Thembi.” Every single rhino matters. If you want to help have a look at: www.wildernessFoundation.co.za Photograph ©Prince Harry A photo posted by Kensington Palace (@kensingtonroyal) on

He also praised his brother’s work in conservation, promising to support him in any way possible.

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