Home Jewels and Jewellery Camilla’s Jewellery: ruby filigree garland necklace

Camilla’s Jewellery: ruby filigree garland necklace

by Victoria Howard

Today marks The Duchess of Cornwall’s 73rd birthday, and what better way to celebrate than looking at one of her most outrageously beautiful necklaces? This is a ruby and diamond filigree multi-strand necklace, which is part of demi-parure, consisting of a necklace, earrings and bracelet.

This four strand necklace showcases filigree diamonds, combined with 18 pear-cut rubies. The largest four sit in the centre, halo set with diamond frames, linked from the bottom to the top.

Embed from Getty Images

Image licensed to i-Images Picture Agency. 17/02/2015. The Duchess of Cornwall arriving at the Royal Film Performance 2015: The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, in London, United Kingdom. Picture by Stephen Lock / i-Images

The Duchess of Cornwall wears a stunning layered ruby necklace to the Royal Film Performance of The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel in 2015

The earrings and a bracelet mimic the design, specifically with the cut of the rubies.

Both FHMJV and the Court Jeweller believe that this demi-parure was a gift from Middle Eastern Royalty, possibly the late Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, who was King of Saudi Arabia. The opulence of the set matches that often seen in royal gifts from these parts.

Camilla’s ruby filigree demi parure earrings

There is also a bracelet that forms part of the Duchess of Cornwall’s ruby filigree demi parure

In 2013, The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall also visited Saudi Arabia. Their official gift list includes a ‘parure’ from the Saudi King, but no further details.

As official gifts, the jewellery is not Camilla’s private property; received them in an official capacity and while she can use the jewellery during her lifetime, and she actually looks after them on behalf of The Queen, in right of the Crown.

Embed from Getty Images

Official gifts from tours and visits will then be returned to the current monarch, after the recipients’ death, and are generally be considered part of the Royal Collection.

You may also like

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.